Addiction Treatments: Petra Thank You for Your Fast Fast Answer… and Very Good… But?

Question by who knows: petra thank you for your fast fast answer… and very good… but?
how does one “treat” addiction? i know there’s aa, but altho he was a member for many years, he won’t go any more. is there truly a “treatment” for addiction if he’s not drinking any more? he refuses to see counselors that have been provided for free by the state of texas, or that are paid for by myself. and he’s the one who asked me to set up the appoinment. when i did and paid for the intake, he said he wasn’t going to go.

thanks for your feedback.

Best answer:

Answer by ron m
a friend of mine was a hard, drink all day alcoholic. when she finally sought help, after a suicide attempt, she went to a doctor. along with psychological help, he prescribed medication. i don’t remember the name, but when she went to take a drink (after a few months on the wagon), she puked up every thing except her toenails. after she did this, once, just the smell of alcohol would make her nauseous

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Dr. Peele: What is addiction? Why do we drink?


 

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14 Responses to “Addiction Treatments: Petra Thank You for Your Fast Fast Answer… and Very Good… But?”

  • Hammersley1967:

    @mammalspod

    “I did? read once about a gene variant that causes lower D2 receptor density being linked with substance abuse in general”

    Now look who’s “taking some words and throwing a theory together”?

    That hypothetical research is more than 20 years old…

    And, like the the juggernaut of biomedical hypotheses, where did it lead us?

    To another biomedical dead end. Just like Nestler’s Delta Fos B gene research and all the other neurotransmitter, genetic and metabolic theories…

  • Hammersley1967:

    @mammalspod

    Ah! Another fundamentalist worshipper of? Scientism that doesn’t even understand the epistemology he worships…

    Give me just ONE example of reductionism and materialism explaining a human behaviour. Just one…

    In fact, where is the reductionist/materialist explanation for mind, subjective perception, or even consciousness itself?

    Neurology has been an academic discipline since 1553…

    It hasn’t even explained consciouisness and you think it can explain addiction?

  • mammalspod:

    This is psychology as a social “science” reasoning. Let’s take some words and throw a theory together with a heavy bias toward learned behavior and free decisions over biologically determined behavior. Then we’ll “test” it? and show how smart it is. Have fun in your obsolete paradigm. Science progresses one funeral at a time. In 100 years psychology as social “science” as we know it will be gone.

  • mammalspod:

    I didn’t say anything about individual neurotransmitters, and I think it’s? funny that these terms have become part of pop psychology, since the interactions are so complicated. I did read once about a gene variant that causes lower D2 receptor density being linked with substance abuse in general. Also there’s some stuff out there about diurnal pattern disruption of HPA axis causing a whole spectrum of things, but this is only the beginning.

  • omoibiIe:

    @mammalspod

    RUBBISH!!!

    Check the research on that hypothesis…

    TIP: Have a look? at Dr Eric Nestler’s research…

    It’s yet another biological dead end…

  • Hammersley1967:

    @mammalspod

    Ah! The old dopamine/noradrenalin/serotonin/etc neurotransmitter theory…

    Forwarded by? Eric Nestler and others…

    It works for methamphetamine and cocaine, but there’s not a shred of peer-reviewed, conclusive evidence to support it with alcohol, marijuana and other process addictions…

    Neat theory though…

  • mammalspod:

    The natural instinct is not “for alcohol”, but it is for the chemical reward produced by alcohol as? well as other things.

  • mammalspod:

    The reason some get addicted to alcohol and some? don’t may actually be caused by the brain’s reward response. If you have adequate drive/reward response, then pleasurable things in life such as eating, accomplishing things, and socializing will trigger gratification. This person will be gratified by alcohol but not to the point that they will risk more socially acceptable and healthy rewards. For reward deficient people regular life is not enough, but they still need to drink their way alcoholic

  • omoibiIe:

    @stantonpeele

    A natural instinct?

    The term “natural instinct” necessarily equates to a biologically evolved? human trait. Let’s leave aside the insurmountable problem of what and why natural selection pressures would be involved in the arising of this “natural instinct”.

    What of Australian Aboriginals and Native Americans that have never, in their racial history, ever been exposed to alcohol?

    How did their “natural instinct” for alcohol intoxication arise?

    ?????????????????????

  • AnviIOfKrom:

    Yeah right.

    My dad was surrounded by hard drinking ex-servicemen in his youth and had less than 20 drinks in his entire 72 years of life.

    He didn’t? like alcohol. Perhaps he wasn’t a real human being with this “inbred” desire for alcoholic intoxication?

    I think he had the disease of sobriety. It also seems that it skipped a? generation and my son inherited it.

    RIDICULOUS!!! Most young people play sport too. Is that an “inbred” proclivity that is a “fundamental” part of the “human condition”?

  • GONZO66656:

    Furthermore, you equate human beings’ desire? for alcohol to “all living beings’ ” desire for intoxication. Can we really equate, or even analogize, the human experience of intoxication to that of a rat? With all the layers of cultural significance and cultural meaning of the human drug experience, can we really sensibly reduce it down to the simple cognition of pleasure/pain in a rodent?
    With respect to your 4th chapter in “The Meaning of Addiction”, I think its a bit more complex than that…

  • GONZO66656:

    Stanton, Stanton, Stanton…

    You’ve spent your whole career asserting that alcohol consumption is a culturally instigated and mediated activity. You’ve chastised the 12? step movement for their unscientific assertions that alcoholism is an inbred disease. And here you turn around and say that drinking is an “inbred” and “fundamental” part of the human condition akin the the survival instinct of breathing oxygen. And all this without a shred of evidence…

  • AnviIOfKrom:

    Yeah right.

    My dad was surrounded by hard drinking ex-servicemen in his youth and had less than 20 drinks in his entire 72 years of life.

    He didn’t like alcohol. Perhaps he wasn’t a real human being with this “inbred”? and “natural” desire for alcoholic intoxication?

    I think he had the disease of sobriety. It also seems that it “skipped” a generation and my son inherited it.

    RIDICULOUS. Most young people play sport too. Is that an “inbred” proclivity that is a “fundamental” human experience?

  • AnviIOfKrom:

    Yeah right.

    My dad was surrounded by hard drinking ex-servicemen in his youth and had less than 20 drinks in his entire 72 years of life.

    He didn’t like alcohol. Perhaps he wasn’t a real human? being with this “inbred” and “natural” desire for alcoholic intoxication?

    I think he had the disease of sobriety. It also seems that it “skipped” a generation and my son inherited it.

    RIDICULOUS. Most young people play sport too. Is that an “inbred” proclivity that is a “fundamental” human experience?